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EUROCOLOR

Fashionable hosiery shades from 1960 to 1999
lovingly collected by Paul Galesko

OPEN

CATALOG

1960

Alazán
Spring/ Summer

The Spanish word ‘alazán’ is translated as ‘sorrel’. Botanists describe the flowers of this plant as follows: light brown with a red hue, like that of cinnamon.


Marron Glacé
Autumn/ Winter

The shade is named after a confection from northern Italy and southern France. Marron Glacé — this is the name of the candied chestnuts covered with caramel.

1961

Saffran
Spring/ Summer


Caramel
Autumn/ Winter

1962

Aprikos
Spring/ Summer


Antilope
Autumn/ Winter

1963

Zibeline
Spring/ Summer


Gazell
Autumn/ Winter

1964

Lido
Capri
Spring/ Summer


Siena
Moreno
Autumn/ Winter

1965

Sahara
Bahama
Spring/ Summer


Muskat
Kastanie
Autumn/ Winter

1966

Solera
Spring/ Summer

The Spanish word ‘solera’ literally translates to ‘oldest barrel’. In winemaking, this term refers to the aging process of liquids such as wine, beer, brandy and vinegar.


Caresse
Autumn/ Winter

1967

Melon
Spring/ Summer


Inka
Maya
Autumn/ Winter

1968

Jasmin
Spring/ Summer


Roma
Autumn/ Winter

1969

Ambra
Spring/ Summer


Saskia
Autumn/ Winter

1970

Vienna
Spring/ Summer


Tivoli
Autumn/ Winter

1971

Baltic
Spring/ Summer


Safari
Autumn/ Winter

1972

Piccadilly
Spring/ Summer


Lola
Autumn/ Winter

1973

Costa Brava
Spring/ Summer


Paola
Autumn/ Winter

The pearlescent gold shade is named after the wife of Crown Prince Albert II and future Queen Paola of Belgium. The princess was a fashion icon throughout the 1960s and 1970s.

1974

Romance
Spring/ Summer


Espresso
Autumn/ Winter

1975

Aurora
Spring/ Summer


Muskat
Autumn/ Winter

1976

Perle
Spring/ Summer


Concorde
Autumn/ Winter

1977

London
Spring/ Summer


Bambi
Autumn/ Winter

1978

Puder
Spring/ Summer


Marbella
Autumn/ Winter

1979

Tundra
Spring/ Summer


Montana
Autumn/ Winter

1980

Scala
Spring/ Summer


Diamant
Autumn/ Winter

1981

Silvia
Spring/ Summer

The very pale shade is named after Queen Silvia of Sweden, wife of King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden.


Casino
Autumn/ Winter

1982

Sissi
Spring/ Summer


Sierra
Autumn/ Winter

1983

Diana
Spring/ Summer

The greyish orange shade is named after Diana, Princess of Wales, who was a masterly master of the language of fashion.


Noblesse
Autumn/ Winter

1984

Paloma
Spring/ Summer


Cappuccino
Autumn/ Winter

1985

Sorbet
Spring/ Summer


Elyssé
Autumn/ Winter

1986

Polar
Spring/ Summer


Sinfonie
Autumn/ Winter

1987

Solaris
Spring/ Summer


Derby
Autumn/ Winter

1988

Sarah
Spring/ Summer

The light bluish-gray shade named after the red-haired British woman Sarah, the Duchess of York.


Mocca
Autumn/ Winter

1989

Gavina
Spring/ Summer


Paradiso
Autumn/ Winter

1990

Garda
Spring/ Summer


Lyon
Autumn/ Winter

1991

Porto
Spring/ Summer


Delphi
Autumn/ Winter

1992

Menuett
Spring/ Summer


Marlene
Autumn/ Winter

1993

York
Spring/ Summer

There is reason to believe that this light purple-gray shade, like the spring 1988 shade, is named after the Duchess of York. But it is not confirmed.


Gaudi
Autumn/ Winter

1994

Tiffany
Artica
Spring/ Summer


Paola
Autumn/ Winter

1995

Capri
Spring/ Summer


Chocolat
Autumn/ Winter

1996

Trianon
Spring/ Summer


Fado
Autumn/ Winter

1997

Angel
Spring/ Summer


Brenda
Autumn/ Winter

1998

Ribeiro
Spring/ Summer


Opera
Autumn/ Winter

1999

Giuiletta
Spring/ Summer


Millennium
Autumn/ Winter

SAMPLES

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Ambra

1969 Spring/ Summer

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Bambi

1977 Autumn/ Winter

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Sissi

1982 Spring/ Summer

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Sierra

1982 Autumn/ Winter

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Diana

1983 Spring/ Summer

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Paloma

1984 Spring/ Summer

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Sinfonie

1986 Autumn/ Winter

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Sarah

1988 Spring/ Summer

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Gavina

1989 Spring/ Summer

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Paradiso

1989 Autumn/ Winter

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York

1993 Spring/ Summer

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Paola

1994 Autumn/ Winter

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Capri

1995 Spring/ Summer

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Millennium

1999 Autumn/ Winter

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EPILOGUE

The history of Eurocolor began in the distant 1960, and ended in the now also distant 1999. But let’s talk about everything in order.

All fashion trends have it’s whims and side tracks. There was a time not that long ago when the standard wardrobe for women were skirt, gown or dresses. As late as the mid 1950’s there were women who never even owned a pair of trousers. There were attempts from famous designer Coco Chanel and actors like Marlene Dietrich or Greta Garbo to introduce slacks for women but they never succeeded among common people. After the war nylon hosiery became widely available, the response was immediate. The production was increased as a result of what seemed as an endless demand.

There were numerous manufacturers so the prices instantly fell. Already in the mid 1950’s there were industrial organizations that wanted to benefit from the new fashion. There were Nyl Suisse that later became the Comité international pour l’élégance du bas (International Committee for the Elegance of Stockings). It was an informal umbrella organization (in other words, an association of manufacturers, who work together formally to coordinate activities) that came together twice a year to ponder and decide over the coming fashion trends. They were a loosely tied bunch of people representing the different manufacturers all over Europe. Their aim or purpose was to provide nylon hosiery in a shade that went along with the other contemporary colours and shades in clothing. The concept Eurocolour was soon adapted. It meant that there were two new fashion shades presented each year. In modern terminology: one for Spring/ Summer and one for Autumn/ Winter.

Initially the concept was very successful. The Committee usually agreed on a blend of skintones and then named it as they pleased. For many years there were ancient shades as Riviera, Capri, Opera or Sahara available. Some of the later inventions as Saskia, Ambra, Inka, Perle or Muskat became evergreens for many years. But many of the shades existed once and were then gone forever. Particularly the many pale spring shades of the 1980’s are almost eradicated today. Silvia, Diana, Paloma, Sorbet, Sarah, Gavina and, the most extreme ever, Polar are all gone.

During the early 1990’s in the European recession the Committee kept on delivering new Eurocolors for no one as it seems. Many of the spring shades came in pale grey/ white tones that fitted princess Fergie but not so many others. There were debates on every single session. If the representatives of the Scandinavian countries agreed on one shade the hispanic totally disagreed. So the verdict was quite seldom unanimous. For some years there were alternate takes or choices.

Some manufacturers, like Spanish J. Rossell always gave their stockings and pantyhose different or alternate fashion shade names. Yet some others like French Dim occasionally joined the Eurocolor team. Several German and Swedish manufacturers consequently used the Eurocolor notion in their advertising throughout the 1980’s. The fashion shade was often stated. After 1995 it was more and more evident that it had become obsolete. It wasn’t advertised at all, nowhere.

There are some things worth to consider: first ever totally grey shade was Noblesse in 1983. Most of the autumn shades are a mix of brown and grey. There are exceptions like Muskat, Paola, Espresso and Mocca, but generally women don’t fancy brown clothing. The brightest one ever is Polar, the darkest are Delphi in black-gray and Paradiso in black-red.

Despite everything, including heated discussions, criticism and even accusations of uselessness, the Committee regularly performed its functions until the end of the 20th century. But in the new century, where fashion trends change almost every minute, Eurocolor has become a part of a beautiful past that will never return… to my great regret.

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Collection and text by Paul Galesko koksflakt@hotmail.com

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